Best TV/Screen for 21:9 aspect ratio? Hardware?


#1

Hi all,

I was wondering.
Last week-end, with my girls playing Tomb Raider, we decided to watch a Lara Croft movie and I noticed that the black bars on top and bottom really are a shame for our Home-cinema setup.
Checking out the reason, I noticed that most movies are done for 29:1 (current 2.35:1 or 2.40:1 aspect ratio). Our own TV being quite old, I told myself there must be something on the market dealing with it.
However, after browsing the Web for about an hour, I didn’t find anything that would display me in hardware a 2.35:1 or 2.40:1 aspect ratio where we don’t have the black bars. They all do Full HD

I know that I could get rid of these by configuring the TV/Display/Aspect ratio - but I paid for a BlueRay, I paid for a TV - and I’d like these to play together nicely without “giving” away half of the screen to black bars…
That is just insanely stupid…

So my question to you folks - anyone found/uses something that decently displays the said aspect ratio correctly without giving away half of the screen to black bars? What’s your take on this, what’s your setup - why is it good/bad?

Thx for any comments, hints etc. :}


#2

How would that be possible?

Full HD = 1920x1080 which is 16:9. This is used for TV-shows but also some movies.
As you said, a lot of movies are 2.35:1 or 2.40:1 which is roughly 1920x800 or 21:9

So basicly you want a TV that doesn’t show black bars for 21:9 content but also is able to show 16:9 content without loss of any pixel?

If you want something where the black borders don’t show, I guess a projector would be the closest to that.


#3

No. I want a TV that shows me a Movie without these bars.
TVShows - not really interested in these.


#4

There are some 21:9 TV’s but I they are not that common (and probably because of that more expensive). What will you do when you want to watch a 16:9 movie because there are a lot of those as well. You’ll be stuck with black borders to the left and right in stead of top and bottom…


#5

Here are a couple of articles explaining aspect ratios and black bars on TVs:
Aspect Ratio Explained
Aspect Ratios Explained Again

Philips did a range of 21:9 TVs way back but they never really took off. They are long discontinued but you may pick one up 2nd hand:
Philips 21:9 TVs

The only way you are going to get rid of the black bars on the TV is to zoom the image and lose picture information on the left & right of the screen or vertically stretch the image and distort the picture.
The only other option is to look at a projection system


#6

That is exactly what I want to avoid … What a crap. Only to sell one’s own format …


#7

Blame the entertainment business for not sticking to 1 format. 4:3, 16:9, 16:10, 21:9, IMAX… Unless some manufacturer is able to create a TV-screen that dynamically adapts its size to the format it plays you will always have black borders on some content.

PS: I claim patent on that idea :slight_smile:


#8

That is exactly my point.
I went the Open Source and Free world exactly as I am not accepting to pay for a product (and now to pay for the possibility to view it as many times as I want) and not being able to view it on the device of my choice (DRM and Crap).
And then when we buy their DRM Crap, it is in such a poor format that the big screen we have is able to be used to 60% only, because the format was so bad we have to black out the rest of the screen…
Idiocracy all over …:joy::thinking:


#9

This is a physical limitation. The format is as it is and is variable. The TV does it’s best to show that format as received on your screen.
It would be as buying a 9.2 speaker setup and complaining that when you listen to the radio and only 2 speakers are used… garbage in, garbage out…


#10

I know that.
I am not complaining. I am just asking if something exists that I can use to watch Movies nicely without these black borders. period.


#11

Seen as not all movies have the same format you will always run into limits. That’s the reason for 16:9 TV’s I guess. Displays all content but with the drawback of black borders for 4:3 or 21:9 etc… content.

As said before, if you want something without borders you will have to get a projector which will only project the content on your screen. But you’ll still have the “problem” that not all of your screen might be used/projected on based on what format content gets projected.


#12

There are historical reasons for all the common aspect ratios, and all are because of physical film formats. Home video presentation was never a consideration i any of the aspect ratio choices for filming movies.

A 21:9 screen really is the best way to handle home video, because it makes the ultra-widescreen formats wider instead of shorter, which was the reason those movies were filmed that way…to feel more expansive. The problem is that without a projector and side masking curtains, showing 1.85:1 movies and HDTV just looks wrong.

Also, a flat panel 21:9 TV that is tall enough to give you the picture size you want is much wider than a standard 16:9 TV. If you have the room for such a wide TV, most people just get a 16:9 TV that gives you a much taller picture on most content. This ruins the effect of “ultra-widescreen” being wider, but people live with it. Then, too, a 21:9 TV would have to be 2520x1080 pixels to allow full 1920x1080 in the center area. That’s creeping up into 4K pixel range, so the TV would be a lot more expensive for just “HD” resolution.


#13

I was being a bit sarcastic with my reply but thanks for this clarification.


#14

Thx for that. That is exactly the Info I wanted.
To be honest, the price never was really an issue. I tend to spend more when I buy stuff, as I hate it to bite myself after because I saved on the wrong side.

I’ll check if I can find some 21:9 TV providing a 2520x1080 :slight_smile: That will prolly be tough, but I love a good challenge anytime :wink:


#15

Depending on what size you want there’s quite a few computer monitors that are 21:9, but very few Tvs. I guess a projector with a 21:9 sized screen would work as well.


#16

You are to late: http://money.cnn.com/2018/01/08/technology/lg-rollable-display-ces-2018/index.html